SK1632 Tutorial, and Introduction to MPLAB’s Harmony

SK1632 Tutorial, and Introduction to MPLAB’s Harmony 

Author: Ng Yong Han

Picture1

 

INTRODUCTION:

Recently, Microchip has added a new firmware development platform for PIC32, which is called MPLAB Harmony. Here is the summary of the features of the MPLAB Harmony:

Picture20

In order to use the MPLAB Harmony, you will need:

  • MPLAB X IDE 3.15 (Install the IDE first!)
  • MPLAB XC32 1.40
  • MPLAB Harmony 1.06
  • and finally, MPLAB Harmony Configurator Tool 1.07

After installing the MPLAB Harmony, you install the Configurator tool by going to the Tools -> Plugins.

Picture6

 

Click on the “Add Plugins” button. 

In the Add Plugins menu, you must go to the “C:\Microchip\Harmony\v1_06\utilities\mhc” [where you install the Harmony] and select “com-microchip-mplab-modules-mhc.chm”.

Click on OPEN if you have selected the plugin.

Before proceeding to creating your new project, make sure you grab the SK1632 and the PIC32MX250F128B-I/SP microcontroller from the Cytron store!

 

TO CREATE A NEW PROJECT:

Click on the button in the red circle:

Picture7

 

Then, in the “New Project” box, click on the “Microchip Embedded”, and then the “32-bit MPLAB Harmony  Project”. Then click “Next >”:

Picture8

 

In the next step, you need to provide the Harmony path. Click the little folder icon in the red circle, and then select the location of the Harmony as shown in the following picture:

The “Project Location” and the “Project Path” will be generated automatically when you provide the correct Harmonypath.  Enter the “sk1632-helloworld” in the “Project Name”, select the “PIC32MX250F128B”  in the  “Target Device” and then press “Finish” to proceed. 

Picture9

After you have pressed Finish, wait for the MPLAB X to load the required Harmony tools. Now the thing that you should do is to configure your microcontroller in your SK1632 for it to run!

 

To launch MPLAB Harmony Configurator, click on:

 

Picture10

 

CONFIGURING THE PERIPHERALS:

On the center of the IDE, collapse a few menu item as shown, check the box on “Use Clock System Service?”, and click “Execute” in the “Launch Clock Configurator”.

Picture11

 

In order for the micorcontroller to function you must configure the oscillator, and the Clock Configurator is a chart showing the parts of the oscillator:

Picture12

 

(Full chart source: http://microchip.wikidot.com/harmony:mhc-overview)

1)  Select “XT” in the “POSCMOD”. Make sure the Primary Oscillator (POSC) value is “8,000,000 Hz” [since we are        using 8MHz crystal ! ].

2)  You must select these options according to the datasheet of the microcontroller, and the 40MHz speed:

  • FPLLDIV = DIV_4
  • FPLLMULT = MUL_20
  • FPLLODIV = DIV_1

Picture9

 

3)  Then, finally, make sure that the Peripheral Bus (PB) is 20MHz. Put “2” in the FPBDIV:

Picture10

4)  Finally, USB is not used in the module, but  we still need to configure it a bit as shown in the following diagram           (it is above the “System PLL”):

Picture11

So we are done setting the oscillator, but we need to activate a few peripherals in the microcontroller. Let us take thefirst simple one for the tutorial which is the “Timer”. Go back to the “Options” in the MPLAB Harmony Configurator menu:

Picture12

In the configuration, select Harmony Framework Configuration->Timer, and a few options are shown there. Follow exactly the options in the picture:

Picture13

And now, you need to see if it’s running too! A blinking LED at a rate of half-second is good enough to get you started! But we need to configure the GPIO on the SK1632 first. Click on the Pin Settings in the menu:

Picture13

Here you see all the pins on that microcontroller, and lists out the functions of the individual pins:

Picture14

In the RA0 (the orange LED in SK1632), click on the “In” on the “Direction (TRIS)” column to change to the “Out”. As usual, the RA0 is now an output. Oh, and also, change the “Mode (ANSEL)” to “Digital”.

When you are done setting all the peripherals and oscillator configuration, click “Save” [the diskette icon] and then  “Generate Code” [with two gears]:

Picture15

Again, wait a moment for MPLAB X to configure the microcontroller. You can come back to the MPLAB Harmony Configurator if you need to activate peripherals or change the oscillator settings in the microcontroller.

 

MAIN PROGRAM:

Now, on your left of the IDE, click on the “Source files”, then “App”, then “main.c”. You are now editing “main.c”:

Picture16

For a very simple project, we add the simple, straightforward delay code using a Timer we have just configured [1]. Add the function prototype “void delay_ms” just after the includes:

Picture17

In the main() function, 

  • Add the “LATA = 0x0000”.
  • In the box with the asterisk (*) comment out the “APP_Tasks()”, add the “PORTAbits.RA0 ^= 1, and delay_ms(500)”.
  • After the main() function, add the delay_ms() function as shown in the picture.

Picture22

Save the work. Now take out your SK1632, solder the headers, connect the crystal, and then connect the PICKit3 to the SK1632:

Picture20

Be sure to connect the USB port to a power bank, or a computer, or a smartphone charger.

Compile, and copy the program into the SK1632:

Picture19

Without errors in the compilation, and a successful connection at the PICKit 3 side, you see this, and the blinking orange LED per half-second. Congratulations, you have created a SKPIC32 project successfully!

Picture22

As an exercise, why not change the blinking speed of the LED by the press of the button on the SK1632?

 

References:

1.) Lucio di Jasio (2008), Programming 32-bit Microcontrollers in C: Exploring the PIC32, Newnes.

, ,

Related Post

Driving RainbowBits with Cytron’s sk1632!

Simple steps to control Stepper Motor using 2Amp Motor Driver Shield and CIKU

Using MDD10A with CIKU

SKds40A + dsPIC30F4013 Library

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *